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Early Human Homes and Sheltering

Page history last edited by PBworks 14 years, 11 months ago

Homes and Shelter

The ancient humans built permanent homes for shelter in the winter. Winter homes were Ice Age huts. They were built in teepee style. They built their winter homes out of ses and mammoth bones. They covered their homes with animal skins. These homes were used for many years. They were very careful about how they built them.

 

how they built their homes.

First they dug holes in the ground, inserted poles into them and tied them tightly together at the point of the teepee. The string was made out of animal guts. Large rocks were put at the bottom of the teepee to hold it in place. A hut found in the Ukraine was big enough to hold an entire tribe.

 

Structure of their homes.

There were several entrances with several rooms, that could hold several fires. In the summer they followed the herds and lived in tents. The tents were sturdy and could be moved from place to place. Their shelters had 4 walls with one window and they used a ladder to crawl down from the roof into the house.These houses were made of sun dried bricks. The roofs were made of straw. They also had big courtyards. The courtyards had fire pits or big ovens to cook food. The houses were very close together. Some of the houses were on a hill.

 

 

Hunters and Gatherers.

 

Hunters and gathers must be continually on th move, following the animals on which they depend and moving to where

the plants they use are avaible.

 

Farmers

 

Farmers are bound to their land. Must be on land to tend to animals and crops. Farmers need a permanent place to

store seeds abd harvest crops.

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